Philanthropist MacKenzie Scott will donate $4.8 million to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Miami-Dade to support its mission of providing educational and afterschool programs for local children. The donation will be used to renovate and transform the northwest club into a state-of-the-art facility. “We are incredibly grateful and...

While losses mounted throughout the cruise industry amid a global pandemic that brought sailings to a screeching halt in March 2020, at least one category connected to passenger ships has seen significant growth. The heavy-metal graveyard. In an effort to offset declining revenue, boutique cruises lines and industry behemoths alike sold older vessels for scrap. Ships familiar to cruise enthusiasts—like Marella Celebration, Cruise & Maritime Voyage’s Marco Polo and Costa Victoria—all were beached and demolished. Meanwhile, Carnival had a veritable garage sale, selling a slew of older ships, many of which, like Imagination, Fantasy and Fascination, wound up as scrap. Then there’s MSC Cruises. Though hardly impervious to the effects COVID-19 had on the industry, MSC didn’t flinch when it came to its big-picture plans. Its ambitious goal of doubling its fleet size (starting in 2017) in less than nine years remained on track with the launch in 2021 of MSC Virtuosa and MSC Seashore—the latter of which made a triumphant debut out of Miami last November. This year, expect to see the debuts of MSC World Europa and MSC Seascape (the sister ship to Seashore). In all, MSC Cruises is scheduled to boast 23 ships by 2025. By that time, or even earlier given current projections, MSC would surpass Carnival in combined passenger capacity to become the second-largest cruise line in the world, behind only Royal Caribbean. “The pandemic did give us the opportunity to re-evaluate. But the good news is that we didn’t change anything,” says Ken Muskat, chief operating officer for MSC Cruises USA. “We didn’t postpone any new builds, we didn’t sell any ships, we didn’t delay anything. We’re on track to continue with the same aggressive new-build plan that we had pre-pandemic, because we’re that committed to the growth. “We’re the fastest-growing brand in the industry. And we feel very confident about what we’re doing moving forward.” Evidence of that confidence is reflected in the state-of-the-art terminal that MSC has planned for PortMiami. The roughly $400 million terminal, which the cruise division of MSC Group announced last year in partnership with Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri, will be able to accommodate upward of 36,000 passengers per day. It will be the largest terminal ever built at PortMiami—almost double the size of Royal Caribbean’s recent “Crown of Miami” terminal. “Terminals are paramount; that’s where the experience starts,” says Pierfrancesco Vago, executive chairman of the MSC Group’s cruise division. “Thanks to the Italian flair that Fincantieri will undoubtedly contribute to this project … this new terminal will become a Miami landmark of style [and] comfort for passengers passing through what’s considered the cruise capital of the world. “It will serve as a platform to support and sustain the expansion of our cruise division across the region and in the Caribbean for years to come.” The terminal, designed by award-winning architecture firm Arquitectonica, includes two new docks (measuring 2,460 feet overall), office spaces, and parking for some 2,400 vehicles; it’s slated for completion by December 2023.

On MSC’s return amid the pandemic: “The whole industry shut down. Think about all the crew that represents, all the people who work in the terminals, all the check-in agents, all the office people—and everything it takes for this industry to operate. We went down...

Though an African-American physician in Chicago, Daniel Hale Williams, is credited with performing an open-heart procedure in 1893 by closing a stab wound to the organ, it would be more than a half-century before a series of breakthroughs slowly shed light on all that was possible involving cardiac surgery. Developments during the mid-20th century, including valve replacement, bypass techniques and the introduction of arteriography (so surgeons can see where blockages are located), allowed medical specialists to treat the heart like never before. Still, it wasn’t that long ago that patients were wheeled out of the operating room following open-heart surgery with a zipper-like swath of stitches that spanned the length of their abdomen. “Open-heart surgeons were swimming in some uncharted waters back in those early days,” says Romualdo Segurola, chief of cardiac surgery for Jackson Health System. “Looking back, I guess you can say they really didn’t know how much they didn’t know. “However, everything is totally different today, especially here at Jackson—from the sophistication of the procedures to the shorter length of stay to the much-shorter recovery time. “And even to the size of the incision, which today can be as little as 2.5 inches.” Indeed, Miami Jackson Memorial Hospital and Jackson Heart Institute, centerpieces of the Jackson Health System, are in the vanguard of dramatic new developments in research, surgery, and minimally invasive treatments that have helped bring cardiac surgery into a whole new realm. Leading the way is Segurola, who’s recognized among his peers for his innovative surgical techniques and for making cardiac surgery available to more people who need it. In addition, he spearheads one of the most pioneering and comprehensive cardiac research programs in the world. Best of all, he’s recognized by his patients as the doctor who gives them a new lease on life when they’ve been told elsewhere that nothing can be done for their heart condition.