Kim Ng remembers the moment. She was 8 years old and attending her first Major League Baseball game on a bright summer weekend afternoon. Ng recalls navigating the interior corridors of Yankee Stadium until she reached her section and finally walked into the open air...

There’s a reason the “corner office” is the most coveted, and it’s not just because the person who occupies it is generally the boss. The corner office is more spacious, and, typically, more interesting. For years, we’ve looked at it longingly from the confines of...

Jared MoskowitzA young man in a perpetual hurry, Jared Moskowitz has been in public life for 15 years, and he’s only 40. Politics has always been in his blood. Born in Coral Springs, Moskowitz grew up in a political household—his father was a big fundraiser for the Democratic party—and he remembers that Jesse Jackson was the first politician he ever met and that Bill and Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden were in his family’s home. Moskowitz, a graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, earned his bachelor’s degree in political science at George Washington and his law degree from Nova Southeastern. He soon jumped into the political waters, interning for Vice President Al Gore and serving as an elector for then-candidate Barack Obama in 2008. A six-year tenure on the Parkland City Commission came next, and then Moskowitz won his seat in Florida’s House of Representatives, which he held from 2012 to 2019. He resigned in order to be appointed to his Emergency Management role under Gov. Ron DeSantis—an unlikely ally from across the political aisle. Soon after COVID-19 struck, the new Emergency Management director made some bold moves: For example, he took on the powerful 3M company to secure more masks for Florida, trolling 3M on Twitter. Moskowitz’s intrepid, independent streak earned even greater visibility once the vaccines became available, when he bucked guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in order to prioritize seniors in the retiree-heavy state. When SFBW caught up with him, he didn’t hold back.

According to the Labor Department’s new Job Openings and Labor Turnover Summary report, 4 million people left their jobs in April, with the biggest losses seen in retail trade; professional and business services; and transportation, warehousing and utilities. As CNBC reports: “Job seekers have a strong...