Ami Brannon was recently promoted to Chief Executive Officer of Neuvana LLC, a West Palm Beach-based neurotechnology company in the electroceuticals industry. Brannon, a co-founder of Neuvana, has been an integral part of the company since its startup phase in 2016. She has most recently served...

Meet Exhibit A of the Great Migration: Aaron Chan. Why would the founder, owner and director of operations of the Boston-based company LCG Health Wellness & Recovery decide to live full-time in Miami’s Edgewater neighborhood? And is the term “Boston-based” therefore even accurate? True, the company Chan founded offers services for emergent healthcare staffing, COVID-19 testing and vaccination operations across Massachusetts and has partnered with the city of Boston, the Boston Public Health Commission and Boston Public Schools, but most days, if he’s not in Edgewater helping to raise his infant son with his former fiance, Chan can be found toting his laptop and his dog to the 1 Hotel South Beach and the Standard Spa—he has memberships at both. Why does he do this? Because he can. Chan explains to SFBW how he ended up being a happy, tropical digital nomad. Aaron, you have a head for business but a medical background. Can you tell us about the latter? I graduated with my nursing degree from UMass Boston in 2011, and I spent around four years in emergency medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, and also worked in post-transplant—kidney, heart, you name it. This is redundant as emergency medicine above refers to the emergency department. It’s pretty punishing work, both mentally and physically but it gave me the foundation of knowledge I have today, of which I was able to build upon. It was very easy to get burnt out though, especially rotating nights and days, depending on the staffing and the patient population. I would look at some people who’d been working for 20 or 30 years and it amazed me how rubbed / worn down they were. It is truly a selfless service, and it does take a special person to really commit their career as a nurse because it is a lot of work. It’s physically and emotionally draining, with the number of hours and overtime you have to provide on a whim, because it’s the right thing to do for the patient. I have enormous respect for the profession, I just didn’t see myself in that specific environment long term. You spent several years at a start-up, Iora Health, as the RN health lead. Did that experience spark your entrepreneurial fire? Just being at Iora and seeing the culture and the business model and meeting the CEO and the two other founders—I always thought, Why can’t I do something? I wanted to be a leader and felt like I never had a voice. I have a lot of opinions, a lot of thoughts about how things should operate, or changes that should be made within the company. That part became frustrating for me.

The South Florida Manufacturers Association (SFMA), the region’s leading resource for manufacturing companies, recently held a ceremony at Signature Grand in Fort Lauderdale to recognize the winners of its 43rd Recognition of Excellence Awards. The ceremony helps signify, celebrate and award manufacturing excellence from an operational and...