On November 4, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) issued an Emergency Temporary Standard (“ETS”) aimed at protecting workers from coronavirus. OSHA indicates that this guidance will increase protections for more than 84 million private-sector workers. The ETS covers...

When Delivery Dudes was founded in 2009 by Jayson Koss, third-party delivery from multiple vendors through a single platform was the future of delivery. Since 2012, it’s been Oliver Tito’s reality. Born and raised in South Africa where his father owned restaurants, Tito immigrated to the United States in 2000. For 12 years, he immersed himself in the hospitality scene of Vail, Colorado, working for hotels, high-end restaurants, golf courses and for celebrity chef Kelly Liken, of Top Chef and Iron Chef fame. Vail is also where Tito met his future wife; she was from South Florida, so the couple moved here in 2012. It was in Delray Beach that Tito was recruited as one of Delivery Dudes’ first restaurant employees, where he began as a driver, moving up the ladder to sales and management. These days, as vice president of sales, Tito heads up the restaurant division. Where the company made its most recent mark is at the Delray Beach Market; users take advantage of Delivery Dudes’ first-of-its-kind technology to order from as many vendors as they would like during a single transaction, with a choice of delivery or pickup. Developed by Delray Beach-based Menin (Bodega Taqueria y Tequila) and managed by Clique Hospitality (which has partnered with MGM Resorts International, Cosmopolitan Las Vegas and Montage Resorts), Delray Beach Market sprawls over 150,000 square feet, housing eateries such as Alpine 210, Surry Co. Smoke House, Tekka Bar, Salvo’s Pizzeria, Dad’s Favorite Burgers & Pies, Ferdo’s Grill, Tip to Tail, Roots and Incredibowl.

DGIM Law is a Miami-based business law firm focused on complex commercial litigation, bankruptcy and insolvency issues. Attorneys Isaac Marcushamer and Daniel Gielchinsky recently formed the contemporary legal practice to help solve challenging business matters. The firm's vision involves using Marcushamer and Gielchinsky's skillsets to...

Verizon recently became a Silver Corporate Partner of the United Way of Broward County after a $20,000 contribution to support public policy efforts with community conversations and the nonprofit organization’s upcoming Mayors’ Gala in 2022. “We are grateful for Verizon’s generous gift to support our organization’s mission to...

When a new executive joins a company, a typical early test is whether the executive is permitted to change an entrenched policy. Lee Ann Edwards confronted this scenario soon after being hired as the president of Altman Management Co., which has developed, constructed, acquired and managed more than 26,000 multifamily homes in Florida and a handful of other states. Edwards describes Joel Altman, chairman and co-CEO of The Altman Cos., as “superbly charming—a big reason I joined the organization. He’s been nothing but cordial, respectful, understanding and supportive of me.” But would he embrace change to go along with new blood? Edwards shares a story that’s illustrative and seemingly small—but it’s only small if employee morale doesn’t matter to you. When she visited various Altman properties, she learned that the site teams didn’t like the fit or feel of the uniforms. (Site teams are composed of property managers, assistant property managers, resident representatives, and maintenance. “They are on the front lines of our image,” Edwards says.) This was no joke: Complaints and even lawsuits about uniforms—for example, in the airline industry—became front-page news from 2017 to 2020. Edwards was told that it was useless, that Altman would never allow the longstanding uniforms and dress codes to be changed. Still, she wrote up a new uniform policy, one more flexible and individualistic, and told her new boss about the pervasive complaints. Altman accepted her recommendations on the spot and allowed her to implement them. Altman Cos. has 30 rental communities across the United States that Edwards oversees. Her résumé uniquely prepared her for the role: With more than 20 years in multifamily property management with several of the industry’s top operating apartment platforms—she knows the industry inside and out. “Part of me coming on board was to help our third-party business, other clients that we manage on behalf of,” Edwards explains. “We manage more sites than we own. Clients are attracted to boutique company like Altman rather than the Greystars and the bigwigs of the world that have 600,000 apartment homes across the U.S. We have about 8,000. We can give our clients more attention.”

Driving around South Florida just took a stylish turn thanks to a Miami-based car rental company that’s making four-wheeled statements out of used vehicles. That’s the general idea behind Vice City Rentals, a concept launched by Luka Ivano that gives customers a menu of eye-catching cars from...