That Patrick Frost is considered to be one the fittest men in America is nothing new. He made his mark as master trainer for Nike and Barry’s Boot Camp. He demonstrated his animal flow workout in Men’s Journal. New Yorkmagazine named him one of 10 “superhuman” trainers, the New York Post called him one of the sexiest New Yorkers on Instagram, and he modeled for Wilhelmina. Even LVMH/Givenchy took notice, tapping Frost to partner in a philanthropic effort to benefit the Bronx School. And he just filmed 18 workouts in six days for the TechnoGym app, inside the studio at the elite workout equipment company in Cesena, Italy. But if you think that this owner of a Burn Boot Camp franchise in Coral Gables—and who leads rigorous digital workouts on his Frost Fit platform—is consumed with how to sculpt the sharpest Adonis belt, think again. This is a physical specimen who has to be coaxed into talking about target body fat. Frost is given to more holistic thinking, and he spoke with SFBW about strength training, masculinity and aging, and the physical and mental benefits of movement. On being a franchisee: “I opened Burn Boot Camp two weeks before COVID-19 hit,” he says. “It mostly draws a general population, predominately women. With Frost Fit, I donate a decent amount of the proceeds [Frost Fit works with charities including the NAACP, Feeding America and the Transgender Law Center], so it’s not something that necessarily fills my bank account, but it is something that fills my soul.” On strength training: “Generally speaking, strength training is probably the best way to go about changing your overall body composition. Gaining muscle throughout the body ends up making your body a more metabolically lean machine. You burn more calories the more muscle you have. If we’re talking specifically about the torso, a lot is dependent on what you eat. It’s common knowledge that we can’t spot reduce—the reality is that it’s a lifestyle shift. You have to have a decent relationship with food. Our bodies are supposed to be able to digest processed food, but the problem is that for a lot of Americans, our diets are highly inflammatory and highly processed. Many of our bodies are missing nutrients; we’re Vitamin D-deficient, magnesium-deficient.”

Boca Raton Museum of Art enjoys the prestigious honor of hosting the world premiere of a much-anticipated exhibition that later will embark on a global tour. Machu Picchu and the Golden Empires of Peru, debuting Oct. 16, will take over the entire two-floor museum as part...