Iter Investments, a venture capital firm that provides capital to businesses involved in the growing psychedelic industry, recently appointed pharmaceutical industry veteran John M.H. Gregg (pictured, left) and medical research council Ph.D. fellow Rayyan Zafar (pictured, top) to its advisory board. “John’s deep expertise in leading biotech...

The latest tenants slated to open at Miami Worldcenter include the world's leading prestige beauty omni-retailer, an innovative electric car brand and the global leader in bowling entertainment. Sephora, Lucid Motors and Bowlero will occupy a combined 60,000 square feet of space in the open-air shopping and entertainment center beginning in 2022. Along...

Born in Detroit, Sam Zietz wasted no time in racking up the bona fides that counted. New York University School of Law, a top-10 school. The law firm of Skadden Arps, one of the world’s most vaunted practices, by both revenue and reputation. Zietz spent only four years as a lawyer before the entrepreneurial spirit took hold. He launched TouchSuite as CEO in Boca Raton in 2003, and in 2018 he discovered Grubbrr, and soon became its CEO. Both companies are leaders in the financial technology sector. With characteristic candor and his signature enthusiasm, Zietz shares with SFBW a few stops along his journey. I received a joint J.D. and L.L.M. at New York University. What a great faculty. Literally, the godfather of every subject was a professor there. I never wanted to be a lawyer. I always wanted to be an entrepreneur. I figured you needed one of two things: You needed money or you needed know-how. I didn’t have money so I figured I better go get some know-how. Fortunately, out of law school I worked at Skadden Arps, where they’re kind enough to give you three years of experience for every year you work there. At Skadden, I was doing structured finance, which is securitizing income streams, and I thought to myself, I need to get one of these. So, I ended up finding the payment space. TouchSuite is a financial technology company that provides businesses throughout the United States and Canada with the ability to accept credit cards, and the technology to facilitate that. I’ve been doing that for nearly 20 years. I’m a big student of history. I got into this arena because when I was exposed to the payment space, to me it was the same as where the cellular phone industry had been 10 years before. You’ve heard the adage that history always repeats itself. All I did was analogize the payment space to the cellphone industry. When cellphones came out they were $1,000, $2,000. All of a sudden, they thought, We’re making a lot of money off that service, so let’s just provide these the cell phones at cost. And then, somebody said, ‘You know what? We’re making so much money off the service, why don’t we give them these phones for free?’

The TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, America's Most Convenient Bank®, today launched the 16th annual Housing for Everyone grant competition, pledging $5.8 million to 33 local housing nonprofit organizations to support affordable housing providers deliver critical resident services to individuals and families...

Avoiding the financial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic has been nearly impossible for many independent retailers and restaurants. To help recognize their commitment to the local economy, the South Florida Independent Retailer Awards (SFIRA) requests the public’s help to identify locally owned retail shops and restaurants worthy...

Since launching earlier in 2021, Enjoy Hemp has continued to produce cannabis products centered around providing the customer with detailed information on how the commodity was derived and its effect on the user. The company recently launched Delta-8 THC Syrup to further its offerings. The syrup transforms...

Juliet Roulhac has been named Broward Workshop’s first female board chair. The nonprofit organization represents over 100 of the county’s major businesses and professions. Along with Roulhac, the organization announced new officers for 2021-22 featuring Vice-chair Steve Hudson, Treasurer Tim Petrillo and Secretary Dodie Keith- Lazowick. The...

Through its Corporate Social Responsibility efforts and The Spirit Charitable Foundation, Spirit Airlines is providing funds, ticket donations and program sponsorships to help support nonprofit organizations centered around education, the environment, arts, service members and disaster recovery. “We believe that change starts by giving back and making...

First, there’s the history. Second, there’s the opulence. These are the two signifiers of the Breakers, Palm Beach’s 538-room hospitality behemoth that endures and thrives, independent of any chain affiliation.

The history of the Breakers is inextricably connected to the cachet of Palm Beach and the annual winter migration of wealthy Northeasterners for “the season.” This is what Henry Flagler had in mind when he built the Breakers in 1896, and his heirs fulfilled the dream when they debuted the 1926 incarnation that lords above the beach today (both the original hotel and its 1904 replacement were destroyed by fire). Flagler and his family didn’t just build a hotel; he created a culture and a destination. In fact, one of Flagler’s many contributions to Florida was to popularize the idea that destination is culture. On my visit last month, a young couple were walking through the lobby—or attempting to. The young man, overwhelmed, turned to the young woman next to him and said, “I’m trying to take pictures, but I don’t want to stop looking at all this.” It sounds like something a ringer or a shill would say, but the 200-foot-long lobby of the Breakers is used to that kind of reaction. Such is the achievement of the New York architectural firm of Schultze & Weaver, which designed the Biltmore hotel in Coral Gables at the same time, and, within a few years, would go on to conjure from the ground up some of Manhattan’s most legendary hotels: the Sherry-Netherland, the Pierre, the Waldorf-Astoria. For the Breakers, the architects sought to recreate a palazzo from the Italian Renaissance, meant to emulate the Villa Medici in Rome (1544) and the Great Hall of the Palazzo Carrega in Genoa (1561). In that spirit, the lobby is framed by rows of columns, the barrel-vaulted ceiling adorned by twinkling Venetian glass chandeliers and the hand-painted artistry of 75 Italian craftsmen. But to focus solely on the hotel’s history and its delirium-inducing opulence is to overlook the fact that the Breakers is committed to a project of continuous enhancement and relevance—set to the tune of $25 million in property upgrades a year. A new gym and spa appeared in the last few years, and until recently, the great expanse a few steps above the lobby was a formal affair with a French name (L’Escalier) and a fine dining menu. But tastes change, and today the space houses HMF, a chic cocktail lounge named for Henry Flagler and created by Tihany Design, which is arguably the hospitality world’s most-exalted interior architectural and design firm. The Breakers’ collaboration with Tihany Design was inaugurated with the launch of HMF in 2012, and has continued as the firm worked on the Flagler Club—the hotel-within-the-hotel that offers butler service and culinary presentations—as well as the Seafood Bar (where the lobster tails are excellent) and ongoing guest room renovations. What the firm is doing with the accommodations is to reconceive them as sanctuaries of softness and lightness, in a mixed transitional style with subtle florals and elements of art deco and midcentury.